The Juliet Report : STYLE

Britt Doherty and Juliet Sulejmani | September 14, 2016

We have been enjoying sharing our style looks with you, and have decided to branch out into some mens looks as well.

‘Oh, boy’ is a light and natural palette and look, ideal for the slight glimpses of Spring that we have been enjoying here in Melbourne.

The look includes a shirt from Marcs, trousers from Bassike and the evermore covetable sneakers from Common Projects.

marcs-benson-regular-shirt
MARCS – Benson Regular Fit Shirt
bassike-mr-man-white-trouser
BASSIKE – Mr Man Trouser
common-projects-mid
COMMON PROJECTS – Original Achilles Mid

 

J & B xx

The Juliet Report : STYLE

Britt Doherty | August 31, 2016

 

Outfit Inspiration: Friday night drinks (I can already taste the champagne)

friday night1
Alpha 60 / Lea Jacket – Navy
friday night2
Country Road / Technical Pant – Black
friday night3
By Nye / Gold Asteroid Choker – Gold
friday night4
Acne Studios / Jensen Grain – Navy

 

Illustrations by Juliet Sulejmani

The Juliet Report : STYLE

Britt Doherty | August 24, 2016

 

Outfit Inspiration: Winter Brunch vibes, with spring in the air.

 

winter brunch1
Base Range / cropped jumpsuite – camel
winter brunch2
Jonathan Saunders / Lee Sunglasses – Tortoise
winter brunch3
Ralph Lauren / Bedelia Loafer – Black
winter brunch4
Acne Studios / Canada Scarf – Black

 

Illustrations by Juliet Sulejmani

Tyler, the Creator’s Golf Wang Fashion Show

Juliet Sulejmani | June 21, 2016

Last week, Tyler the Creator, who is well known as a rapper, songwriter and producer amongst an array of other things, presented his first ever fashion show for his brand ‘GOLF’. At the show, he also announced his new footwear line called ‘Golf Lefleur’, meaning Flower Boy.

This is the second show of it’s kind, the first being Kanye West’s presentation of his last Yeezy Season Collection, where the designer not only presents their collection, but also performs for their guests.

For both shows, I was sitting front row, watching from my iMac monitor.

Guys, girls, some models and some not and a couple of younger kids, all of various backgrounds, body shapes and sizes were used to walk, ride or skate down the runway, which was designed as a skate park. Tyler explains that he is not following any rules, hasn’t ever attended a fashion show, but just loves creating and making clothes, and after collaborating with other brands, such as Vans, etc., he decided that it was time for him start his own brand.

The show was fun, happy and colourful. The collection is inspired by flowers, sportswear, and by LA which is where he lives, which you can tell from the vibrancy and summer feel of his clothing.

Tyler announced that his shoe line is still in sample stages however everyone who had purchased a ticket to his show would receive a free pair of shoes by the end of the year. Tyler also released his new song titled ‘Ego’ which sounded to me quite similar to Kanye West’s song New Slaves, which obviously was on purpose and quite fitting. Kanye was there to support his friend, along with many other celebrities and musicians.

I think Tyler’s show and Kanye West’s show, are very important markers in fashion history, because what they are doing is very different to what already exists in the industry. At a typical fashion show the designer merely peeps out right at the end, and quickly disappears back behind the curtain, whereas in this case, the designers (Kanye and Tyler) are used to being on stage. They are performers and great entertainers, and naturally they are comfortable with being front and centre, so this adds something extra to the overall experience. These designers also have quite a lot of creative control and freedom over the entire show, and they use this power to bring the audience even deeper into their story.

It is also important to take note that the designers have had to push through many boundaries, be it their success in other areas which binds them to only that arena, or their race, which if you notice, their aren’t many African American designers in the fashion industry. Even the type of clothing they’re creating is different from how people expect rappers to dress.

Another difference with Tyler’s fashion collection is that unlike other shows, where you have to wait pretty much a whole year for it to be released, Tyler’s is already available for pre-order on his website www.golfwang.com.

I like that the overall theme within Tyler’s collection portrays inclusivity and the everyday person, there is no discrimination just a celebration of life and the things you love. I am excited to see how these new designers will help to shape the industry in the near future.

Links:

Dark Wonderland – Toni Maticevski

Juliet Sulejmani | May 6, 2016

If you thought the exhibitions at Bendigo Art Gallery couldn’t get any better, well, here’s news for you.

Bendigo Art Gallery has just announced Dark Wonderland, which will be Toni Maticevski‘s first ever exhibition. With work spanning over Toni Maticevski’s 20 year career, including objects from his early practice to his most recent work, the Monaco Gown worn by Princess Mary to the King’s 80th birthday, and the commissioned gold lame gown worn by Jessica Mauboy for Eurovision 2014.

Maticevski is one of Australia’s most talented fashion designers, who is also recognised internationally for his designs, and has created a body of work that is diverse and focused on ideas and creative challenges.

Karen Quinlan (Director of the Bendigo Art Gallery), commenting on the exhibition, said: “Toni Maticevski has managed to morph, adapt and defy the boundaries of fashion, crossing the line that divides fashion design with fine art. For anyone who has ever dreamed of wearing a masterpiece, this is a must-see exhibition,”

The exhibition opens 13 August  – 20 November 2016. Bendigo Art Gallery

 

200 Years of Australian Fashion

Juliet Sulejmani | April 26, 2016

NGV Australia
Ground Level, Temporary Exhibitions
5 March 2016 – 31 July 2016
Open 10am-5pm daily

I attended a seminar at the NGV last week titled Fashion is Art and heard from a lot of interesting people, who had a lot of interesting stories to share. I think it would be a shame to keep all that information to myself, so this is the first of a few posts that I will write on the seminar. I hope that you enjoy.

The first speaker was Paolo Di Trocchio who is the Curator of Fashion and Textiles at the NGV. Paola introduced the topic ‘Fashion is Art’ and explained the details behind the exhibition ‘200 years of Australian Fashion’ that she curated.

Paola explained that she was extremely excited to be able to have the opportunity to curate an exhibition that would encompass ‘200 years of the remarkable, growth, design and innovation in this country.’

The exhibition starts with the earliest known surviving dress from 1805, which is made out of Indian muslin and ends with a special commission by Dion Lee which was created only two months ago specifically for the exhibition.

It took just over two months for the exhibition to be curated and because this is the first major survey of Australian Fashion, they also needed to create an image that would represent the 200 years.

The NGV worked with Virgina Dowzer and Bronwyn Kidd to create the image, which has been illustrated by me at the top of this post. The image is set at the beach, Wilson’s Prom, because they saw ‘the beach as representative of the optimism of Australia, the freedom, the light, and colour, themes and ideas that are referred to in relation to Australian fashion.’

One piece was chosen from the various themes of the exhibition to represent the 200 years. The beach, the garments and models were photographed separately and then photoshopped together to create the image.

The Themes that you will see in the exhibition are:

1805: the earliest known dress and the beginning of a network of international trade
The Department Store: the shopping platform at the time, including Bright and Hitchcocks/Geelong, Farmer and Co, La Petite, Robertson and Moffat
Dressmakers and Tailors: the first makers, Miss Scott (Brisbane), Doak and Beatty (Sydney)
The Salon, from 1930s to the 1950s.: a more intimate shopping environment, represented by Lillian Wightman who opened Le Louvre and moved her boutique to the top end of Collins street, which is still referred to as The Paris End of Collins street
1960s: this part celebrates the mini dress through facets of 1960s, futuristic space age hippy movement, flower power and sports.
Flamingo park: 1973, Jenny Kee, opens her frock salon in the strand arcade
Art clothes: exhibition in 1980 in NSW, that places contemporary Australian fashion, previous to that it was large international fashion or historical fashion that was celebrated in the art gallery.
Fashion Design Council: which was an organisation founded in 1983 in order to nurture and support young talent and talent, e.g. Martin Grant, Christopher Graf, Jenny Banister.
Fashion Weeks: presents Australian fashion on the international stage, firstly with Colette Dinnigan who presents in paris, in 1995, then with the development like Australian fashion week in 1996 and the Melbourne Fashion Festival.
Contemporary Fashion: strong individuals and examples of Australian fashion, and purposely  isolated on individual platforms so as to celebrate the unique signatures of our incredibly strong and incredibly talented contemporary Australian Designers.

Jx

 

Why Fashion Matters

Juliet Sulejmani | April 14, 2016

Why Fashion Matters by Frances Corner
144 PAGES
First Published 2014
Frances Corner, Head of London College of Fashion, Author

 

I was perusing the bookshelves at the Ian Potter Gallery Book Store and the quirky look of this book and title caught my eye.

The book is basically made up of 101 thoughts or mini essays on why fashion matters. Looking at fashion from a super wide lens (which is fantastic), and including, not just how wearing clothes makes us feel, but also the changes taking place in the industry, manufacturing and sustainability to just name a few things.

As someone who recently studied fashion design, worked in the industry and reads almost everything that is published relating to fashion, I didn’t really gain any extra insight, unfortunately.

However, Why Fashion Matters would be a great book for someone with limited fashion industry knowledge, or for someone who was thinking about studying or getting a job in the industry.

One thing I will be using the book for though is the part at the back of the book, and I’m just having a giggle to myself because I just realised the part I love is called ‘Further Reading and Selected Sources’.

Anyone who has studied a course will recognise this title, it is usually at the back of all the course unit outlines, and absolutely no except for the curious and smart ones student ever bothers to do any further reading. And I’m giggling because it is so typical for a teacher, in this case, Frances Corner who is the Head of London College of Fashion, to include such a section at the back of her book, and I love her for it.

Jx

Book 17 for 2016

Notes and Quotes

  • “The prehistoric caveman with the latest beads, the post-war woman in Dior’s New Look, the latest fashion blog recording street style as it happens – they are all tied to our very human need to express individuality.” Page 7
  • Read Marcel Proust, Doris Lessing, Jean Rhys, Virgina Woolfs’ Orlando.
  • “According to a Cotton Inc. survey, the average American woman owns 8.3pairs (jeans).” Page 25
  • Who is Jane Sheperdson? Page 57
  • “The words we never use might be like the clothes we can never wear.”  – Adam Philips Page 109
  • “Should I kill myself or have a cup of coffee?” – Albert Camus Page 110

The Juliet Report Wardrobe

by Juliet Sulejmani | March, 16 2016

Let me take you back to a few months ago, on a night when I felt like treating myself to something fancy.

I went straight to NET-A-PORTER, the ultimate online shopping destination for any fashion loving human on planet Earth. I started by looking through my favourite brands, looking to see what was on offer. And to my dismay, there was not  a single item that I could purchase with my ‘something fancy for me’ budget.

I then, went to that side bar, and chose the option ‘Price low to high’ by the way if you try that right now, you’ll actually get quite a nice range, must have been the end of the season when I was looking, there were a bunch of beauty products and underwear that I could buy, but that wasn’t what I was really looking for. And this is when I started thinking…

What if an online Fashion Store existed, one where you could go and actually buy these magical pieces as a treat for yourself, or for someone nice and not spend all the money that you have in your bank account. Wouldn’t that just be the best thing in the world? Well of course it would.

So my friends, I’d like to welcome you all to The Juliet Report Wardrobe. The Juliet Report Wardrobe is a print store where you will be able to buy prints of coveted fashion items, and in the future also other items such as furniture, books, etc.

The first item in stock in  The Juliet Report Wardrobe are these gorgeous NO.21 Satin Mules in Emerald. Shop them HERE, or click on the SHOP link at the top of the page.

I have put my pair in a frame right beside my computer on my desk and they really brighten up the space.

Jx