The Juliet Report : STYLE

Britt Doherty | August 31, 2016

 

Outfit Inspiration: Friday night drinks (I can already taste the champagne)

friday night1
Alpha 60 / Lea Jacket – Navy
friday night2
Country Road / Technical Pant – Black
friday night3
By Nye / Gold Asteroid Choker – Gold
friday night4
Acne Studios / Jensen Grain – Navy

 

Illustrations by Juliet Sulejmani

The Juliet Report : STYLE

Britt Doherty | August 24, 2016

 

Outfit Inspiration: Winter Brunch vibes, with spring in the air.

 

winter brunch1
Base Range / cropped jumpsuite – camel
winter brunch2
Jonathan Saunders / Lee Sunglasses – Tortoise
winter brunch3
Ralph Lauren / Bedelia Loafer – Black
winter brunch4
Acne Studios / Canada Scarf – Black

 

Illustrations by Juliet Sulejmani

HIStory?

Eddie Cleaver | June 24, 2016

The Oxford English Dictionary defines history as “the branch of knowledge that deals with past events; the formal record or study of past events, especially human affairs”. It is the definitive record of human exploits throughout time.  We study history at school, we refer to it throughout life, we watch it in the making, we use it to learn lessons from the past, to use as a basis for progression and to record achievements, or failures. History gives us an opportunity to leave our mark on the world, to extend our story beyond our short lives. Being annulled into the realms of history allows us to live forever.

But isn’t history just a version of events? Recordings of those holding influence and power, those cultures who developed the written word, one of many versions of the reality of our past. There has been very little input into recorded history by 49.6% of the population for starters. To put so much reliance on historical record or to chase inclusion within it overlooks its most basic flaws. History is littered with inaccuracies, conflicting accounts, misinterpretation, personal influence, perjury, political and religious propaganda, guesswork even. To place so much emphasis on history seems absurd in today’s world of reliance on scientific study. Should it be put in the same category as story, fairytale, legend or religion? It would seem we should take history with a herculean pinch of salt.

Some influential humans live on, immortalised in history while others, many equally as influential, are forgotten. Why do we know of Darwin yet not Wallace, Tutankhamun yet not Hatshepsut, who was Cecilia Payne (the discovery of the elements which make up stars could seem to be of reasonable importance)?

Every scientific theory built upon the unrecognised steps of so many. Every war fought by the unquestioning loyalty of the humble infantryman or the advice of those less celebrated. What of the assistants and collaborators, mentors and supporters, those who often did the hard yards and dedicated their lives with little or no reward. They are lost in time, unable to be heard like ghosts searching for the afterlife.

There are many heroes, less so heroines, and always the obligatory villains. Often two sides of the same coin, just a change in lead characters. Who is the terrorist and who is the freedom fighter?

Do the realities of history even stand the test of time? We laud famous battles and leaders while forgetting the atrocities of war and colonisation. Are the achievements of a football team more important than those of Marie Curie? IMO they could be if that team is Liverpool FC. Is proving a somewhat tenuous genealogical link to Genghis Khan (a genetic test that is widely available) a badge of honour or a symbol of shame? Maybe it is an insight into the male psyche.

What if history tells us more than at first appears, what if history is more than a record of events over time. What if history is a record of what we want it to reflect, a reflection of our hopes and fears, our dreams and nightmares and most likely our egos and desires. It’s almost as if it was HIStory……….  

Tyler, the Creator’s Golf Wang Fashion Show

Juliet Sulejmani | June 21, 2016

Last week, Tyler the Creator, who is well known as a rapper, songwriter and producer amongst an array of other things, presented his first ever fashion show for his brand ‘GOLF’. At the show, he also announced his new footwear line called ‘Golf Lefleur’, meaning Flower Boy.

This is the second show of it’s kind, the first being Kanye West’s presentation of his last Yeezy Season Collection, where the designer not only presents their collection, but also performs for their guests.

For both shows, I was sitting front row, watching from my iMac monitor.

Guys, girls, some models and some not and a couple of younger kids, all of various backgrounds, body shapes and sizes were used to walk, ride or skate down the runway, which was designed as a skate park. Tyler explains that he is not following any rules, hasn’t ever attended a fashion show, but just loves creating and making clothes, and after collaborating with other brands, such as Vans, etc., he decided that it was time for him start his own brand.

The show was fun, happy and colourful. The collection is inspired by flowers, sportswear, and by LA which is where he lives, which you can tell from the vibrancy and summer feel of his clothing.

Tyler announced that his shoe line is still in sample stages however everyone who had purchased a ticket to his show would receive a free pair of shoes by the end of the year. Tyler also released his new song titled ‘Ego’ which sounded to me quite similar to Kanye West’s song New Slaves, which obviously was on purpose and quite fitting. Kanye was there to support his friend, along with many other celebrities and musicians.

I think Tyler’s show and Kanye West’s show, are very important markers in fashion history, because what they are doing is very different to what already exists in the industry. At a typical fashion show the designer merely peeps out right at the end, and quickly disappears back behind the curtain, whereas in this case, the designers (Kanye and Tyler) are used to being on stage. They are performers and great entertainers, and naturally they are comfortable with being front and centre, so this adds something extra to the overall experience. These designers also have quite a lot of creative control and freedom over the entire show, and they use this power to bring the audience even deeper into their story.

It is also important to take note that the designers have had to push through many boundaries, be it their success in other areas which binds them to only that arena, or their race, which if you notice, their aren’t many African American designers in the fashion industry. Even the type of clothing they’re creating is different from how people expect rappers to dress.

Another difference with Tyler’s fashion collection is that unlike other shows, where you have to wait pretty much a whole year for it to be released, Tyler’s is already available for pre-order on his website www.golfwang.com.

I like that the overall theme within Tyler’s collection portrays inclusivity and the everyday person, there is no discrimination just a celebration of life and the things you love. I am excited to see how these new designers will help to shape the industry in the near future.

Links:

200 Years of Australian Fashion

Juliet Sulejmani | April 26, 2016

NGV Australia
Ground Level, Temporary Exhibitions
5 March 2016 – 31 July 2016
Open 10am-5pm daily

I attended a seminar at the NGV last week titled Fashion is Art and heard from a lot of interesting people, who had a lot of interesting stories to share. I think it would be a shame to keep all that information to myself, so this is the first of a few posts that I will write on the seminar. I hope that you enjoy.

The first speaker was Paolo Di Trocchio who is the Curator of Fashion and Textiles at the NGV. Paola introduced the topic ‘Fashion is Art’ and explained the details behind the exhibition ‘200 years of Australian Fashion’ that she curated.

Paola explained that she was extremely excited to be able to have the opportunity to curate an exhibition that would encompass ‘200 years of the remarkable, growth, design and innovation in this country.’

The exhibition starts with the earliest known surviving dress from 1805, which is made out of Indian muslin and ends with a special commission by Dion Lee which was created only two months ago specifically for the exhibition.

It took just over two months for the exhibition to be curated and because this is the first major survey of Australian Fashion, they also needed to create an image that would represent the 200 years.

The NGV worked with Virgina Dowzer and Bronwyn Kidd to create the image, which has been illustrated by me at the top of this post. The image is set at the beach, Wilson’s Prom, because they saw ‘the beach as representative of the optimism of Australia, the freedom, the light, and colour, themes and ideas that are referred to in relation to Australian fashion.’

One piece was chosen from the various themes of the exhibition to represent the 200 years. The beach, the garments and models were photographed separately and then photoshopped together to create the image.

The Themes that you will see in the exhibition are:

1805: the earliest known dress and the beginning of a network of international trade
The Department Store: the shopping platform at the time, including Bright and Hitchcocks/Geelong, Farmer and Co, La Petite, Robertson and Moffat
Dressmakers and Tailors: the first makers, Miss Scott (Brisbane), Doak and Beatty (Sydney)
The Salon, from 1930s to the 1950s.: a more intimate shopping environment, represented by Lillian Wightman who opened Le Louvre and moved her boutique to the top end of Collins street, which is still referred to as The Paris End of Collins street
1960s: this part celebrates the mini dress through facets of 1960s, futuristic space age hippy movement, flower power and sports.
Flamingo park: 1973, Jenny Kee, opens her frock salon in the strand arcade
Art clothes: exhibition in 1980 in NSW, that places contemporary Australian fashion, previous to that it was large international fashion or historical fashion that was celebrated in the art gallery.
Fashion Design Council: which was an organisation founded in 1983 in order to nurture and support young talent and talent, e.g. Martin Grant, Christopher Graf, Jenny Banister.
Fashion Weeks: presents Australian fashion on the international stage, firstly with Colette Dinnigan who presents in paris, in 1995, then with the development like Australian fashion week in 1996 and the Melbourne Fashion Festival.
Contemporary Fashion: strong individuals and examples of Australian fashion, and purposely  isolated on individual platforms so as to celebrate the unique signatures of our incredibly strong and incredibly talented contemporary Australian Designers.

Jx

 

The big 5 by Dr Sanjiv Chopra

Juliet Sulejmani | April 19, 2016

The Big 5, by Dr Sanjiv Chopra with David Fisher
202 PAGES
PUBLISH DATE 10.05.2016
Health and Personal Development
Dr Sanjiv Chopra, Professor of Medicine & Faculty Dean, Director of Clinical Hepatology and Author
David Fisher , Author

 

Pan Macmillan sent me this book a couple weeks ago, it is a proof copy and will be published in May.

The big 5 things that Chopra says will enable you to live a longer and healthier life are:

Coffee
Vitamin D
Exercise
Nuts and
Meditation

This book explains why each of the above is good for you and also provides many examples of studies to prove the point.

I used to be concerned with drinking a lot of coffee, only because other people kept telling me it wasn’t good for me. However, thanks to Chopra and his research, I will be drinking coffee happily without any concern whatsoever.

After reading even just the first chapter, it felt like this switch in my mind flicked on to ‘activate’ and my focus became much sharper. This book gave me the foundation and inspiration I needed to make simple adjustments to live a healthier, longer life.

Jx

 

Notes and Quotes:

  • “Worldwide, an estimated 2.25 billion cups of coffee are consumed every day”
  • According to Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos “you haven’t had enough coffee until you can thread a sewing machine while it’s running.”
  • “If it wasn’t for coffee, I’d have no identifiable personality whatsoever.” David Letterman
  • “As Honore Balzac wrote almost two centuries ago, ‘As soon as coffee is in your stomach, there is a general commotion. Ideas begin to move…similes arise, the paper is covered. Coffee is your ally and writing ceases to struggle.'”
  • “The best time to produce vitamin D is when your shadow is shorter than your height.”
  • “…during prehistoric times if a person couldn’t move quickly and wasn’t strong, that person died.”
  • “In 2838BC Chinese scholars listed the hazelnut as one of the five sacred foods that the gods had bestowed upon human beings.”
  • “The goal of meditation isn’t to control your thoughts, it’s to stop letting them control you.”
  • “Let me leave you with an ancient aphorism. You should meditate once a day, and if you don’t have time for that, you should meditate twice a day.”
  • “Popular diets today are designed and marketed for profit.”

Watch. Read. Eat. Vegan

Emma Noack | April, 18 2016

Watch. Read. Eat. Vegan

Veganism is more that just what you eat. It becomes a way of life. To me it is about making conscious choices and knowing what I am spending those dollars on and what the ethical, environmental and health impacts those choices are having. Over the next few months I will write some posts about things that interest me as a vegan. These posts don’t have an agenda to convert everyone into vegans, but rather I’m just interested in putting some ideas out there about the choices we all make and creating a discussion about what impact they have and why we make the choices we do. I guess I just want to give you, quite literally, some food for thought.

Watch: Step one: watch Bag It! This documentary explains not only the environmental effect plastic has on the planet, but also the health risks (both mental and physical) that plastic has on us as individuals.

Read: After watching Bag It! you may need to visit Trash Is For Tossers to put into practice everything you have just learned. I recommend taking small steps so you don’t feel overwhelmed. By making small changes in your life to create less waste and use less plastic you can minimise the waste you contribute to our oceans and minimise your own exposure to plastic. My top three tips to creating less waste are:

  1. Carry a spare tote bag with you everywhere. It comes in handy so often and prevents you needing to get yet another plastic bag.
  2. Carrying your own plastic free water bottle, like this Klean Kanteen one around with you to stay hydrated. This choice means less plastic bottle waste, and it also may encourage you to drink more water, and possibly chose water over other less healthy options.
  3. Visiting grocery stores that have bulk foods available (such as Friends of the Earth, Source Bulk Foods and Terra Madre in Melbourne) and bring your own bags and jars to put the foods in. This is an efficient way to decrease packaging waste (and it’s actually a cheaper way to shop and the foods tend to be healthier options). Buy your pasta, grains, nuts, tea and more this way and save on plastic and money.

Eat: Just one meal a week OR day that is vegetarian or vegan is a way of having an effect. Voting with your dollar and spending money on less animal based products is a way to tell companies and the planet that more ethical and less wasteful commodities are in demand and important to you as a consumer. Either pop into Smith and Deli for a delicious ‘Foghorn Legless’ sandwich and a delicious desert or make this pasta (adapted from Minimalist Baker) below:

Creamy Vegan Garlic Pasta with Roasted Tomatoes

Ingredients

  • 3 cups of cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 250g quinoa or spelt pasta (or any pasta you prefer)
  • Olive oil
  • 2 medium shallots, diced
  • 8 large cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • Sea salt and black pepper
  • 3-4 Tbsp spelt flour
  • 2 1/2 cups unsweetened plain almond milk (Pure Harvest and Nutty Bruce are tow of the better ones available)
  • A large handful of spinach
  • ¼ cup of Kalamata olives, pitted and halved

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 200C and toss tomatoes in a bit of olive oil and sea salt. Place cut side up on a lined baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes while you prepare the rest of the dish. Then set aside.
  2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and cook pasta. When done, drain, cover and set aside.
  3. In the meantime, prepare the sauce. In a large pan over medium-low heat, add 1 Tbsp olive oil and the garlic and shallot. Add a pinch of salt and black pepper and stir frequently, cooking for 3-4 minutes until softened and fragrant.
  4. Stir in 3-4 Tbsp flour and mix with a whisk. Once combined, slowly whisk in the almond milk a little at a time so clumps don’t form. Add another healthy pinch of salt and black pepper, bring to a simmer and continue cooking for another 4-5 minutes to thicken. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed. (Optional: You can also add a few shakes of vegan parmesan for extra flavor at this time if you wish.)
  5. Once the sauce is to your desired thickness add spinach and olives then add pasta and roasted tomatoes and stir.
  6. Serve immediately and garnish with extra black pepper, fresh basil and/or vegan parmesan cheese.

Natural Banana Protein Bars

Juliet Sulejmani | April, 15 2016

Cooking is something I actually really enjoy doing. I really love being to be able to create something delicious from a bunch of random ingredients, and then be able to share that delicious food with my friends and family. I have noticed that when I share food that I have made, it makes the people I share it with really happy and in turn it makes me  really happy.

The latest recipe I have tried and shared was from Jessica Sepel’s first book The Healthy Life (which was also the first book I illustrated). I made the ‘Natural Banana Protein Bars’.

I loved making these because like most of the recipes in this book, preparation time is minimal, all the ingredients are quite good for you, and they are really delicious.

These were great to wrap individually in baking paper and pop in my bag on days I didn’t have time for breakfast, or as a snack after exercising.

I will totally be making these again.

Jx


Jessica Sepel’s Natural Banana Protein Bars

INGREDIENTS
DRY
1/2 cup rolled organic oats (gluten-free option: quinoa flakes)
1/2 cup LSA or protein powder
1/4 cup mixed seeds
3 tbsp chia seeds
1/2 cup chopped raw walnuts and/or almonds
1/4 cup shredded coconut
1/4 cup psyllium husk
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp sea salt
1 tsp vanilla powder
WET
1 banana, mashed
2 tbsp nut butter
1/4 cup maple syrup or rice malt syrup
1 tbsp milk

  1. Preheat the oven to 180.C (160.C fan-forced). Line a standard loaf tin (approximately 21cm x 11cm) with baking paper (you can grease with olive oil as well).
  2. Combine the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk the wet ingredients together.
  4. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and combine well with a wooden spoon.
  5. Pour the batter into the tin and press down firmly. Bake 20-25 minutes or until cooked through and the top is golden brown.
  6. Allow to cool in the tin then slice into bars.These can be kept in an airtight container in the fridge for a week.

    Makes about 10 slices.
    PREP Time: 35 minutes, including cooking.

Why Fashion Matters

Juliet Sulejmani | April 14, 2016

Why Fashion Matters by Frances Corner
144 PAGES
First Published 2014
Frances Corner, Head of London College of Fashion, Author

 

I was perusing the bookshelves at the Ian Potter Gallery Book Store and the quirky look of this book and title caught my eye.

The book is basically made up of 101 thoughts or mini essays on why fashion matters. Looking at fashion from a super wide lens (which is fantastic), and including, not just how wearing clothes makes us feel, but also the changes taking place in the industry, manufacturing and sustainability to just name a few things.

As someone who recently studied fashion design, worked in the industry and reads almost everything that is published relating to fashion, I didn’t really gain any extra insight, unfortunately.

However, Why Fashion Matters would be a great book for someone with limited fashion industry knowledge, or for someone who was thinking about studying or getting a job in the industry.

One thing I will be using the book for though is the part at the back of the book, and I’m just having a giggle to myself because I just realised the part I love is called ‘Further Reading and Selected Sources’.

Anyone who has studied a course will recognise this title, it is usually at the back of all the course unit outlines, and absolutely no except for the curious and smart ones student ever bothers to do any further reading. And I’m giggling because it is so typical for a teacher, in this case, Frances Corner who is the Head of London College of Fashion, to include such a section at the back of her book, and I love her for it.

Jx

Book 17 for 2016

Notes and Quotes

  • “The prehistoric caveman with the latest beads, the post-war woman in Dior’s New Look, the latest fashion blog recording street style as it happens – they are all tied to our very human need to express individuality.” Page 7
  • Read Marcel Proust, Doris Lessing, Jean Rhys, Virgina Woolfs’ Orlando.
  • “According to a Cotton Inc. survey, the average American woman owns 8.3pairs (jeans).” Page 25
  • Who is Jane Sheperdson? Page 57
  • “The words we never use might be like the clothes we can never wear.”  – Adam Philips Page 109
  • “Should I kill myself or have a cup of coffee?” – Albert Camus Page 110

Son of Saul

Juliet Sulejmani | April 13, 2016

Son of Saul / Saul fia (2015)
Director: Laszlo Nemes
Hungarian
Drama/Thriller/War
Cast: Geza Rohrig, Levente Molnar, Urs Rechn
Writers: Laslzo Nemes, Clara Royer
1h 47min

 

My friend Baz asked me to go to the movies with him to watch Son of Saul. He said something like, it’s based on WW2, and something about prisoners who had to work in the camps. Baz and I usually always like the same things so of course I said yes.

Son of Saul, a Hungarian film also called Saul fia. The first feature film for director László Nemes. The film premiered at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival and won the Grand Prix, it also won Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Award this year amongst other awards.

The film takes place over two days, in an Auschwitz concentration camp during World War II and follows Saul Auslander a Hungarian who has been made a Sonderkommando -prisoners who have no choice but to help the Nazis exterminate Jews.

So, I have watched a few films based on World War II and read quite a few books, such as; The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, Night, The Book Thief, The Diary of a Young Girl Anne Frank, and I’ve been to Germany, so I know about that terrible, terrible, terrible time in history. However this film, this film, excuse my language, was fucked. It’s the only word I could think of after I left the cinema. The film really shares this story with you in an unforgettable way.

It is a powerful film and I am really glad that I watched it, and at the same time those scenes of horror are etched in my mind forever. Baz and I left the cinema and didn’t know what to say. What those people went through, it is just unimaginable, and the fact that it actually happened, it just really makes you think. About humanity, about power, about how lucky we are.

I am not at all surprised that Son of Saul won an Oscar, it was shot so well, the whole time you feel like you are seeing what is happening right through Saul’s eyes. A lot of the horrific scenes are a blur, but you don’t really need to see it to understand what is going on.

Jx

Film 19 for 2016